New reports on ruru nesting and Island conservation

Date posted: 02-Oct-2017

Two new reports have been added to the website. The first gives details of a summer students..

2018 calendars now available

Date posted: 27-Sep-2017

Our latest calendar, beautifully illustrated with images taken on the Island, is now available fo..

Guided walks for photographers

Date posted: 21-Jun-2017

For a wonderful day of wildlife photography please join us on Tiritiri Matangi Island for a Ph..

Ferry discounts for Supporters

Date posted: 18-May-2017

Tiritiri Matangi Island, the perfect winter's day trip. The birds are at their best, warm up w..

More kiwi for the Island

Date posted: 04-Apr-2017

In 1993 and 1995, sixteen little spotted kiwi were released on Tiritiri Matangi Island. The ma..

2017 Photo Competition

Date posted: 22-Mar-2017

It is that time of year again when we are looking for entries for our photo competition (and phot..

The 2017 concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2017

This year's concert promises to be another wonderful and unique experience. Click here (/concert-..

Shorebird Film Festival at Devonport

Date posted: 26-Oct-2016

Click here (/miscellaneous documents/DevWaderFilms.jpg) for details of a forthcoming film festival c..

Extra Dawn Chorus Trip

Date posted: 20-Oct-2016

Stop Press: Extra Dawn Chorus trip now scheduled for Thursday 27th October 2016. ..

2016 AGM

Date posted: 06-Sep-2016

The 2016 AGM was held at the Kohia Centre at 7:30 pm on Monday 19th September. Click here (/..

Whau

Botanical name:  Entelea arborescens
Maori name:  Whau
Common name:  Cork tree
Height:  6 metres


Whau
A shrub or small tree with large soft attractive leaves giving a tropical appearance. Found in low forest along the coast and inland. It is a rapid shade producer.

The flowers are white and occur early spring to mid summer. The dry fruit capsules are very distinct brown and covered with spines not unlike in appearance to thistle.

The wood is very light and was used by the Maori as fishing floats.  It is thought to be as light as balsa wood.

Entelea is an endemic genus consisting of just the one species. It is placed in the mallow family, Malvaceae, which includes hollyhocks, Chinese lanterns, hibiscus, lacebarks and ribbon wood. 

The trunks of some members have tough fibres which form a layer under the bark. These fibres have been used by mankind in many countries to make ropes, hats, mats and fishing nets. The most important fibre in this family comes from the cotton plant, Gossypium species.

Whau is short-lived (about 10 years) and is rare on mainland NZ as its lush green leaves are sought after by browsing animals.   

  

Photography by Neil Davies © (above, seed heads) and Martin Sanders © (left, flower).