2019 Concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2019

OrigiNZ, the tartan taonga are returning for the 2019 concert. Click..

Young Conservation Superstars win awards!

Date posted: 27-Jan-2019

Gabriel Barbosa and teacher Kate Asher, a team leader who co..

Entries for the 2019 photo competition

Date posted: 19-Jan-2019

We are now taking entries for the 2019 photographic competition. You can enter u..

Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Winners of kokako photo competition

Date posted: 02-Sep-2018

The stunning winning photographs from those submitted to the competition as part..

Kokako Celebration

Date posted: 21-Jul-2018

(https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-kokako-story-celebrating-21-years-..

Kokako Photographic Competition

Date posted: 20-Jul-2018

KĊŒKAKO PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION Celebrating 21 years on Tiritiri Matangi To ce..

New monitoring reports published

Date posted: 19-Jul-2018

Reports on monitoring studies carried out over the past year have now been poste..

2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Turepo

Botanical name:  Streblus heterophyllus
Maori name:  Turepo
Common name:  Milk Tree
Height:  12 metres

Turepo - foliage

This small tree is widespread in lowland forest. The trees are dioecious (sexes separate) and the very small flowers are massed into drooping spikes.

Flowering occurs from mid-spring through summer and red berries ripen on female trees from late spring to autumn.

Turepo has a juvenile form which has distinctive juvenile leaves (fiddle-shaped).

Turepo exudes a sweetish milky sap when twigs are broken or bark is cut.

Early settlers collected this and used it in tea as a milk substitute.

The genus Streblus has a widespread distribution in the Pacific, South East Asia and Eastern Australia.  There are 3 endemic species in New Zealand, 2 of which are present on Tiritiri Matangi.  The genus belongs in the mulberry family, Moraceae.

Photography by Neil Davies ©