2014 Photo Competition

Date posted: 07-Jun-2014

The results are out! Many thanks to our judge Bruce Shanks for doing such a wonderful jo..

Ecology Journal marks 25 years of Tiritiri

Date posted: 25-Nov-2013

The latest issue of the New Zealand Journal of Ecology is dedicated entirely to Tiritiri..

New bequests initiative

Date posted: 09-Sep-2013

Watch out for coverage in the national media this week for a new campaign by 'Include a Charity ..

2013 Photo Competition

Date posted: 27-Jan-2013

It is that time of year again, when we are looking for entries to our photographic c..

Film of the Kokako Week Jazz Concert

Date posted: 03-Oct-2012

Many thanks to Pieter Huisman who made this short film of the wonderful Jazz concert hel..

Greg

Date posted: 15-Aug-2012

Sadly, Greg the Takahe died on Sunday 12th August. As many Island regulars will know, Greg had b..

Kiwi Survey a great success

Date posted: 03-Aug-2012

It's Kiwi survey time again on the Island. Here are some selected highlights from a report by Ma..

2012 Photo competition

Date posted: 16-Mar-2012

Yet again we are running our almost famous photo competition on the island so please get your ca..

Art for kokako week

Date posted: 27-Feb-2012

Artwork for our Kokako Week event is now being delivered to the Island by our visiting artists a..

New water supply on Tiri

Date posted: 15-May-2011

Kiwi Well Drillers have spent a working week on the Island drilling a new well. They have p..

Turepo

Botanical name:  Streblus heterophyllus
Maori name:  Turepo
Common name:  Milk Tree
Height:  12 metres

Turepo - foliage

This small tree is widespread in lowland forest. The trees are dioecious (sexes separate) and the very small flowers are massed into drooping spikes.

Flowering occurs from mid-spring through summer and red berries ripen on female trees from late spring to autumn.

Turepo has a juvenile form which has distinctive juvenile leaves (fiddle-shaped).

Turepo exudes a sweetish milky sap when twigs are broken or bark is cut.

Early settlers collected this and used it in tea as a milk substitute.

The genus Streblus has a widespread distribution in the Pacific, South East Asia and Eastern Australia.  There are 3 endemic species in New Zealand, 2 of which are present on Tiritiri Matangi.  The genus belongs in the mulberry family, Moraceae.

Photography by Neil Davies ©