More plaudits for Tiritiri Matangi

Date posted: 15-Jul-2019

Recognition of the wonderful experience visitors have when visiting the Island h..

Results of the 2019 Photo Competition

Date posted: 15-Jul-2019

The results of this year's competition have now been decided. Click here (/2019-photo-co..

Lighthouse Open Day

Date posted: 30-Apr-2019

Our historic lighthouse, signal station and diaphonic foghorn will all be on dis..

We need a new Treasurer

Date posted: 08-Apr-2019

The Supporters need a new treasurer to take over in September when Kevin Vaughan..

2019 Concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2019

OrigiNZ, the tartan taonga are returning for the 2019 concert. Click..

Tiri's three unique foghorns

Date posted: 01-Feb-2019

Our next social event will take place on Monday 18th March when Carl Hayson and ..

Young Conservation Superstars win awards!

Date posted: 27-Jan-2019

Gabriel Barbosa and teacher Kate Asher, a team leader who co..

Entries for the 2019 photo competition

Date posted: 19-Jan-2019

We are now taking entries for the 2019 photographic competition. You can enter u..

Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Shore skink

The shore skink (Oligosoma smithi) is found in the northern part of the North Island and, as its name indicates, it frequents shorelines, particularly beaches. It is active during the day, and is often found around driftwood and other debris. On boulder beaches they can become extremely common. They grow to around eight centimetres in length and are highly variable in their colouring - from almost black to pale cream. They can be heavily speckled.

The shore skink is one of three native skinks occurring on Tiritiri Matangi and the only one to have been introduced. Thirty shore skinks were released on the Island in 2006 and 23 in 2011. The population was monitored annually for three years from January 2011-January 2013, and further, less frequent surveys are planned. While the population has not increased dramatically, they appear to be holding their own and gravid females (like the one shown on the right) have been caught during each survey. They also appear to be spreading slightly from the original release site.

Photographs by Dylan van Winkel © (top left) and Roger Bray © (bottom right)