2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Wetapunga talk coming soon

Date posted: 05-Feb-2018

For the Social on 19 March the speaker will be Ben Goodwin of Auckland Zoo, who will talk about t..

Rat caught and now takahe released from pens

Date posted: 28-Jan-2018

Thankfully DOC staff Andre de Graaf and Polly Hall and their assistants have trapped the rat whic..

Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

2018 Photo Comp opens for entries

Date posted: 27-Nov-2017

The 2018 Photo Competition is now open for entries. Click here (/2018-photo-competition-tiritiri-mat..

New reports on ruru nesting and Island conservation

Date posted: 02-Oct-2017

Two new reports have been added to the website. The first gives details of a summer students..

2018 calendars now available

Date posted: 27-Sep-2017

Our latest calendar, beautifully illustrated with images taken on the Island, is now available fo..

Guided walks for photographers

Date posted: 21-Jun-2017

For a wonderful day of wildlife photography please join us on Tiritiri Matangi Island for a Ph..

Ferry discounts for Supporters

Date posted: 18-May-2017

Tiritiri Matangi Island, the perfect winter's day trip. The birds are at their best, warm up w..

More kiwi for the Island

Date posted: 04-Apr-2017

In 1993 and 1995, sixteen little spotted kiwi were released on Tiritiri Matangi Island. The ma..

Plants

Rasp FernBetween 1984 and 1994, 250,000 - 300,000 trees were planted by volunteers.  The island is now 60% re-vegetated, the other 40% being left as grassland for such species as takahe, for views and to protect archaeological remains.
 

The trees planted were, in most cases, raised on Tiritiri Matangi from seeds collected on the island or nearby so as to maintain genetic purity.

The wattle trees in Wattle Valley were encouraged as they provide shade for seedlings and are also an excellent source of food in winter for such species as the honeyeaters.

A number of plants, not originally believed to have existed on Tiritiri Matangi, have been introduced because of their scientific importance (eg New Zealand Bignonia (Tecomanthe speciosa) and Kaka Beak (Clianthus puniceus).

Plants have been categorised as Trees and ShrubsClimbers and Scramblers and Monocots and Grasses.  You can view a list of the plants in each of these categories by clicking any of the links.

Photography by Eve Manning © - Rasp fern