Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Winners of kokako photo competition

Date posted: 02-Sep-2018

The stunning winning photographs from those submitted to the competition as part..

Kokako Celebration

Date posted: 21-Jul-2018

(https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-kokako-story-celebrating-21-years-..

Kokako Photographic Competition

Date posted: 20-Jul-2018

KĊŒKAKO PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION Celebrating 21 years on Tiritiri Matangi To ce..

New monitoring reports published

Date posted: 19-Jul-2018

Reports on monitoring studies carried out over the past year have now been poste..

2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Wetapunga talk coming soon

Date posted: 05-Feb-2018

For the Social on 19 March the speaker will be Ben Goodwin of Auckland Zoo, who will talk about t..

Rat caught and now takahe released from pens

Date posted: 28-Jan-2018

Thankfully DOC staff Andre de Graaf and Polly Hall and their assistants have trapped the rat whic..

Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

Mahoe

Botanical name:  Melicytis ramiflorus
Maori name:  Mahoe
Common name:  Whitey Wood
Height:  10 metres
 
Mahoe, whitey wood, fruit
A small tree usually spreading with distinctive light bark often covered by patches of white lichen, a feature which gives it it’s common name. It is found throughout New Zealand in lowland to lower mountain forest.

Dioecious, tiny yellowish flowers appear along the branches November - December with a lighter flowering April - May.  Female trees produce attractive purple fruit in January - March.

Genus Melicytus is confined to the south west Pacific region of Australia, New Zealand, New Caledonia and some other smaller islands. They all belong in the violet family, Violaceae, and New Zealand has 11 species.

Maori used a flat piece of mahoe wood rubbed vigorously with a pointed piece of kaikomako (Pennantia corymbosa) to produce fire.

Rapid shade producer.

Mahoe bark
Mahoe, whitey wood, flowers


Photography by Peter Craw
© (flowers, bottom left), Eve Manning © (fruit, top right), Neil Davies © (bark, bottom right)