Annual General Meeting

Date posted: 05-Sep-2014

Our 25th Annual General Meeting will take place at 7:30 pm on Monday 22nd September at the Kohia..

Tales of Tiritiri

Date posted: 25-Jun-2014

Your 'tales of Tiritiri' are now on the website! As part of our 25th Anniversary..

More Specialist Guided Walks

Date posted: 17-Jun-2014

If your interest is in ornithology or photography please join us on Tiritiri Matangi Isl..

2014 Photo Competition

Date posted: 07-Jun-2014

The results are out! Many thanks to our judge Bruce Shanks for doing such a wonderful jo..

Dawn Chorus Trips

Date posted: 29-May-2014

Are you an early riser? Even if not, it is surely worth making an exception to hear..

25th Annniversary celebrations

Date posted: 04-Dec-2013

The Supporters of Tiritiri Matangi (SoTM) turned 25 in October 2013! We are planning lot..

Ecology Journal marks 25 years of Tiritiri

Date posted: 25-Nov-2013

The latest issue of the New Zealand Journal of Ecology is dedicated entirely to Tiritiri..

New recipe book

Date posted: 22-Oct-2013

Our new recipe book, Gourmet on Tiritiri Matangi Island - Second helpings, has just..

New bequests initiative

Date posted: 09-Sep-2013

Watch out for coverage in the national media this week for a new campaign by 'Include a Charity ..

New 2014 Calendar now available

Date posted: 03-Sep-2013

Our stunning new calendar is now available. For just $15 you'll have a wonderful selection of ph..

Kumarahou

Botanical name:  Pomaderris kumaraho
Maori name:  Kumarahou
Common name:  Golden Tainui, Gum Digger's soap
Height:  3-4 metres

Kumarohou

Kumarahou is an endemic species which occurs naturally in the upper North Island as far south as the Bay of Plenty. It is commonly called “gum diggers soap” as a slight lather can be formed when its flowers are rubbed with water. The flowers contain saponin a substance which is used in detergents and foaming agents. Another early name was poverty weed as it often grows in poor clay soils.

 

The Maori name Kumarahou is said to mean “kumara planting time” decided by when the flowers appear.  Kumarahou flowers in mid September on Tiritiri Matangi, displaying attractive soft masses of golden yellow blossom. This is followed by small seed capsules November to January.

 

Maori medicinal uses. Fresh leaves of Kumarahou were applied to wounds. Wounds were also bathed in an extract collected from boiling the leaves. 


Photography by Eve Manning
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