Guided walks for photographers

Date posted: 21-Jun-2017

For a wonderful day of wildlife photography please join us on Tiritiri Matangi Island for a Ph..

Ferry discounts for Supporters

Date posted: 18-May-2017

Tiritiri Matangi Island, the perfect winter's day trip. The birds are at their best, warm up w..

More kiwi for the Island

Date posted: 04-Apr-2017

In 1993 and 1995, sixteen little spotted kiwi were released on Tiritiri Matangi Island. The ma..

2017 Photo Competition

Date posted: 22-Mar-2017

It is that time of year again when we are looking for entries for our photo competition (and phot..

The 2017 concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2017

This year's concert promises to be another wonderful and unique experience. Click here (/concert-..

Shorebird Film Festival at Devonport

Date posted: 26-Oct-2016

Click here (/miscellaneous documents/DevWaderFilms.jpg) for details of a forthcoming film festival c..

Extra Dawn Chorus Trip

Date posted: 20-Oct-2016

Stop Press: Extra Dawn Chorus trip now scheduled for Thursday 27th October 2016. ..

2016 AGM

Date posted: 06-Sep-2016

The 2016 AGM was held at the Kohia Centre at 7:30 pm on Monday 19th September. Click here (/..

New hihi film

Date posted: 30-Jul-2016

A wonderful new film describing the hihi story on Tiritiri Matangi has now been added to the hih..

New Wildside video

Date posted: 29-Jul-2016

Click here (https://blog.doc.govt.nz/2016/06/21/tiritiri-matangi-volunteers/) to view a wo..

Kumarahou

Botanical name:  Pomaderris kumaraho
Maori name:  Kumarahou
Common name:  Golden Tainui, Gum Digger's soap
Height:  3-4 metres

Kumarohou

Kumarahou is an endemic species which occurs naturally in the upper North Island as far south as the Bay of Plenty. It is commonly called “gum diggers soap” as a slight lather can be formed when its flowers are rubbed with water. The flowers contain saponin a substance which is used in detergents and foaming agents. Another early name was poverty weed as it often grows in poor clay soils.

 

The Maori name Kumarahou is said to mean “kumara planting time” decided by when the flowers appear.  Kumarahou flowers in mid September on Tiritiri Matangi, displaying attractive soft masses of golden yellow blossom. This is followed by small seed capsules November to January.

 

Maori medicinal uses. Fresh leaves of Kumarahou were applied to wounds. Wounds were also bathed in an extract collected from boiling the leaves. 


Photography by Eve Manning
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