30th Birthday Dinner

Date posted: 06-Sep-2018

Please join us in celebrating the 30th anniversary of the formation of the Suppo..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Winners of kokako photo competition

Date posted: 02-Sep-2018

The stunning winning photographs from those submitted to the competition as part..

Kokako Celebration

Date posted: 21-Jul-2018

(https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-kokako-story-celebrating-21-years-..

Kokako Photographic Competition

Date posted: 20-Jul-2018

KĊŒKAKO PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION Celebrating 21 years on Tiritiri Matangi To ce..

New monitoring reports published

Date posted: 19-Jul-2018

Reports on monitoring studies carried out over the past year have now been poste..

2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Wetapunga talk coming soon

Date posted: 05-Feb-2018

For the Social on 19 March the speaker will be Ben Goodwin of Auckland Zoo, who will talk about t..

Rat caught and now takahe released from pens

Date posted: 28-Jan-2018

Thankfully DOC staff Andre de Graaf and Polly Hall and their assistants have trapped the rat whic..

Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

Koromiko

Botanical name:  Hebe stricta
Maori name:  Koromiko
Common name:  Hebe
Height:  2-3 metres

Koromiko

Koromiko forms a shrub or small tree with dull green to green-yellow lance shaped leaves. Its tiny flowers are compacted into dense inflorescences longer than the leaves. The flowers are sweetly scented and vary in colour being lilac, mauve or white. Flowering occurs summer and autumn. 

 

Koromiko can be prominent in coastal scrub and its range is naturally restricted to the North Island.

 

Hebe forms N.Z’s largest genus of flowering plants. Its members express a wide ecological and morphological diversity with their habitats ranging from coastal margins to alpine regions up to 2800m above sea level. This is considered to be the highest altitude for a flowering plant in New Zealand. Their form varies from large-leaved shrubs or small trees to examples with small scale-like leaves.


Eighty eight species have been described (Hebes, Bayly and Kellow, Te Papa Press 2006). Hebe is regarded essentially as a New Zealand genus as 85 species are endemic. Two species occur in South America as well as the South Island New Zealand (possibly being distributed from New Zealand by albatross). A single species, Hebe rapensis, is endemic to Rapa in French Polynesia.


Koromiko has long been valued for its beneficial effects in cases of diarrhoea and dysentery. It was mentioned in “Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia” 1895, listed as an import from New Zealand and used as a remedy for chronic dysentery and diarrhoea. 

 

Another early use describes liquid from boiling the leaves being used as a mouth-wash or gargle. During World War II koromiko leaves were sent overseas to NZ troops in North Africa where they were used effectively to treat dysentery.

Koromiko
















Photography by Anne Rimmer
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