Shorebird Film Festival at Devonport

Date posted: 26-Oct-2016

Click here (/miscellaneous documents/DevWaderFilms.jpg) for details of a forthcoming film festival c..

Extra Dawn Chorus Trip

Date posted: 20-Oct-2016

Stop Press: Extra Dawn Chorus trip now scheduled for Thursday 27th October 2016. ..

2016 AGM

Date posted: 06-Sep-2016

The 2016 AGM was held at the Kohia Centre at 7:30 pm on Monday 19th September. Click here (/..

New hihi film

Date posted: 30-Jul-2016

A wonderful new film describing the hihi story on Tiritiri Matangi has now been added to the hih..

New Wildside video

Date posted: 29-Jul-2016

Click here (https://blog.doc.govt.nz/2016/06/21/tiritiri-matangi-volunteers/) to view a wo..

2016 Photo competetion winners

Date posted: 04-Jun-2016

This year's winning photographs have been decided. Click here (/photocomp2016) to see the wonder..

Great new ferry fares for Supporters

Date posted: 04-Jun-2016

Thanks to our ferry company, 360 Discovery (https://www.fullers.co.nz/destinations/tiritiri-mata..

More plaudits for Tiritiri Matangi

Date posted: 04-Jun-2016

Recognition of the wonderful experience visitors have when visiting the Island has been recognis..

Reports for 2015-2016

Date posted: 04-Jun-2016

Reports for the 2015-16 breeding season for kokako and hihi have been added to the website. ..

Guided walks for Photographers

Date posted: 07-Apr-2016

If your interest is in wildlife photography please join us on Tiritiri Matangi Islan..

Koromiko

Botanical name:  Hebe stricta
Maori name:  Koromiko
Common name:  Hebe
Height:  2-3 metres

Koromiko

Koromiko forms a shrub or small tree with dull green to green-yellow lance shaped leaves. Its tiny flowers are compacted into dense inflorescences longer than the leaves. The flowers are sweetly scented and vary in colour being lilac, mauve or white. Flowering occurs summer and autumn. 

 

Koromiko can be prominent in coastal scrub and its range is naturally restricted to the North Island.

 

Hebe forms N.Z’s largest genus of flowering plants. Its members express a wide ecological and morphological diversity with their habitats ranging from coastal margins to alpine regions up to 2800m above sea level. This is considered to be the highest altitude for a flowering plant in New Zealand. Their form varies from large-leaved shrubs or small trees to examples with small scale-like leaves.


Eighty eight species have been described (Hebes, Bayly and Kellow, Te Papa Press 2006). Hebe is regarded essentially as a New Zealand genus as 85 species are endemic. Two species occur in South America as well as the South Island New Zealand (possibly being distributed from New Zealand by albatross). A single species, Hebe rapensis, is endemic to Rapa in French Polynesia.


Koromiko has long been valued for its beneficial effects in cases of diarrhoea and dysentery. It was mentioned in “Martindale: The Extra Pharmacopoeia” 1895, listed as an import from New Zealand and used as a remedy for chronic dysentery and diarrhoea. 

 

Another early use describes liquid from boiling the leaves being used as a mouth-wash or gargle. During World War II koromiko leaves were sent overseas to NZ troops in North Africa where they were used effectively to treat dysentery.

Koromiko
















Photography by Anne Rimmer
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