More plaudits for Tiritiri Matangi

Date posted: 15-Jul-2019

Recognition of the wonderful experience visitors have when visiting the Island h..

Results of the 2019 Photo Competition

Date posted: 15-Jul-2019

The results of this year's competition have now been decided. Click here (/2019-photo-co..

Lighthouse Open Day

Date posted: 30-Apr-2019

Our historic lighthouse, signal station and diaphonic foghorn will all be on dis..

We need a new Treasurer

Date posted: 08-Apr-2019

The Supporters need a new treasurer to take over in September when Kevin Vaughan..

2019 Concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2019

OrigiNZ, the tartan taonga are returning for the 2019 concert. Click..

Tiri's three unique foghorns

Date posted: 01-Feb-2019

Our next social event will take place on Monday 18th March when Carl Hayson and ..

Young Conservation Superstars win awards!

Date posted: 27-Jan-2019

Gabriel Barbosa and teacher Kate Asher, a team leader who co..

Entries for the 2019 photo competition

Date posted: 19-Jan-2019

We are now taking entries for the 2019 photographic competition. You can enter u..

Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Duvaucel's gecko

Duvaucel's gecko (Hoplodactylus duvaucelii) is New Zealand's largest gecko. They grow up to 30cm in length (nose to tail) and can weigh up to 120 grams. They live in forest and scrub and are mainly nocturnal, foraging both on the ground and in trees, feeding on large invertebrates such as weta. 

Like many native lizards, they were probably once widespread on the mainland, but have been decimated by introduced mammalian predators and are now largely confined to offshore islands. A dead Duvaucel's gecko was found on the North Island in 2010, suggesting that there might still be some small, isolated mainland populations.

Nineteen Duvaucel's geckos were introduced onto Tiritiri Matangi in 2006. Regular surveys have indicated that they have bred successfully and begun to spread out from the original release site. In early 2013, a further 92 have been released at three different sites on the Island. These include a mixture of wild-caught and captive-bred individuals. They are being monitored closely over a period of at least five years in order to provide robust data which will help inform future efforts to conserve the species.

The gecko in the above photo has just been weighed and measured and marked with a number (which quickly wears off). 

The photo on the left shows the inky footprints of a Duvaucel's gecko on a tracking card used for monitoring the population. 

Photos: Kay Milton ©