30th Birthday Dinner

Date posted: 06-Sep-2018

Please join us in celebrating the 30th anniversary of the formation of the Suppo..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Winners of kokako photo competition

Date posted: 02-Sep-2018

The stunning winning photographs from those submitted to the competition as part..

Kokako Celebration

Date posted: 21-Jul-2018

(https://www.eventbrite.com/e/the-great-kokako-story-celebrating-21-years-..

Kokako Photographic Competition

Date posted: 20-Jul-2018

KĊŒKAKO PHOTOGRAPHIC COMPETITION Celebrating 21 years on Tiritiri Matangi To ce..

New monitoring reports published

Date posted: 19-Jul-2018

Reports on monitoring studies carried out over the past year have now been poste..

2018 Concert coming up soon

Date posted: 15-Feb-2018

Our 2018 concert will feature an afternoon of light classics and jazz courtesy of the Auckland Ph..

Wetapunga talk coming soon

Date posted: 05-Feb-2018

For the Social on 19 March the speaker will be Ben Goodwin of Auckland Zoo, who will talk about t..

Rat caught and now takahe released from pens

Date posted: 28-Jan-2018

Thankfully DOC staff Andre de Graaf and Polly Hall and their assistants have trapped the rat whic..

Your Christmas Shopping for a Song

Date posted: 04-Dec-2017

Aka - The Grand Christmas Shopping Expedition to Tiritiri Matangi Island Shop Dreading..

Duvaucel's gecko

Duvaucel's gecko (Hoplodactylus duvaucelii) is New Zealand's largest gecko. They grow up to 30cm in length (nose to tail) and can weigh up to 120 grams. They live in forest and scrub and are mainly nocturnal, foraging both on the ground and in trees, feeding on large invertebrates such as weta. 

Like many native lizards, they were probably once widespread on the mainland, but have been decimated by introduced mammalian predators and are now largely confined to offshore islands. A dead Duvaucel's gecko was found on the North Island in 2010, suggesting that there might still be some small, isolated mainland populations.

Nineteen Duvaucel's geckos were introduced onto Tiritiri Matangi in 2006. Regular surveys have indicated that they have bred successfully and begun to spread out from the original release site. In early 2013, a further 92 have been released at three different sites on the Island. These include a mixture of wild-caught and captive-bred individuals. They are being monitored closely over a period of at least five years in order to provide robust data which will help inform future efforts to conserve the species.

The gecko in the above photo has just been weighed and measured and marked with a number (which quickly wears off). 

The photo on the left shows the inky footprints of a Duvaucel's gecko on a tracking card used for monitoring the population. 

Photos: Kay Milton ©