More plaudits for Tiritiri Matangi

Date posted: 15-Jul-2019

Recognition of the wonderful experience visitors have when visiting the Island h..

Results of the 2019 Photo Competition

Date posted: 15-Jul-2019

The results of this year's competition have now been decided. Click here (/2019-photo-co..

Lighthouse Open Day

Date posted: 30-Apr-2019

Our historic lighthouse, signal station and diaphonic foghorn will all be on dis..

We need a new Treasurer

Date posted: 08-Apr-2019

The Supporters need a new treasurer to take over in September when Kevin Vaughan..

2019 Concert

Date posted: 05-Feb-2019

OrigiNZ, the tartan taonga are returning for the 2019 concert. Click..

Tiri's three unique foghorns

Date posted: 01-Feb-2019

Our next social event will take place on Monday 18th March when Carl Hayson and ..

Young Conservation Superstars win awards!

Date posted: 27-Jan-2019

Gabriel Barbosa and teacher Kate Asher, a team leader who co..

Entries for the 2019 photo competition

Date posted: 19-Jan-2019

We are now taking entries for the 2019 photographic competition. You can enter u..

Hihi volunteer needed

Date posted: 18-Oct-2018

Would you like to volunteer with the Island's hihi team and learn from them how ..

2019 Calendars now available

Date posted: 05-Sep-2018

The new 2019 calendars are now available and this year's is better than ever! Th..

Botanical Naming

Botanical plant names follow an International code that groups botanically similar plants in a systematic way based on the structure of their flowers.  The system allows for four levels of naming; Family, Genus, Species, Cultivar.

The last three levels are used in situations such as plant labels. 

A user friendly useful way of relating to botanical naming is to think of the Genus as a surname and the species name as the Christian name.

For example in the name  Metrosideros excelsa (Pohutakawa)

Metrosideros is the Genus (surname) and excelsa is the species (christian name)

Metrosideros excelsa is Pohutakawa  or New Zealand Christmas Tree

Metrosideros umbellata is South Island rata

Metrosideros robusta is Northern rata

All scientific names for fauna and flora are either displayed in italics or underlined. The genus is capitalised and the rest of the scientific name is in lower case.

Photography by Stella Friedlander ©